What tense should i write my research paper in

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Using the Correct Verb Tense–Critical to Making an Impact on the Reader

There’s no consensus on verb tenses in research papers. For the literature review, most academic editors recommend using the past simple or present perfect when talking about past research, and the present simple when referring to general truths. When citing previous research in your article, use past tense. Whatever a previous researcher said, did or wrote happened at some specific, definite time in the past and is not still being done. Results that were relevant only in the past or to a particular study and have not yet been generally accepted as fact also should be expressed in past tense. 14/05/ · When to use present tense: In general you want to use the present tense throughout most of your discussion. This includes discussion of your results (The data suggests that ghrelin levels can be easily manipulated) and limitations of your research (It is possible that the results were the effect of factors other than those being studied).

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When citing previous research in your article, use past tense. Whatever a previous researcher said, did or wrote happened at some specific, definite time in the past and is not still being done. Results that were relevant only in the past or to a particular study and have not yet been generally accepted as fact also should be expressed in past tense. There’s no consensus on verb tenses in research papers. For the literature review, most academic editors recommend using the past simple or present perfect when talking about past research, and the present simple when referring to general truths. Past Or Present Tense In Scientific Writing For Research.

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When citing previous research in your article, use past tense. Whatever a previous researcher said, did or wrote happened at some specific, definite time in the past and is not still being done. Results that were relevant only in the past or to a particular study and have not yet been generally accepted as fact also should be expressed in past tense. Past Or Present Tense In Scientific Writing For Research. 14/05/ · When to use present tense: In general you want to use the present tense throughout most of your discussion. This includes discussion of your results (The data suggests that ghrelin levels can be easily manipulated) and limitations of your research (It is possible that the results were the effect of factors other than those being studied).

Which Verb Tenses Should I Use in a Research Paper? | Wordvice
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The danger of imitating others’ writing style

When citing previous research in your article, use past tense. Whatever a previous researcher said, did or wrote happened at some specific, definite time in the past and is not still being done. Results that were relevant only in the past or to a particular study and have not yet been generally accepted as fact also should be expressed in past tense. There’s no consensus on verb tenses in research papers. For the literature review, most academic editors recommend using the past simple or present perfect when talking about past research, and the present simple when referring to general truths. Past Or Present Tense In Scientific Writing For Research.

Writing About Your Research: Verb Tense | Graduate Connections | Nebraska
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14/05/ · When to use present tense: In general you want to use the present tense throughout most of your discussion. This includes discussion of your results (The data suggests that ghrelin levels can be easily manipulated) and limitations of your research (It is possible that the results were the effect of factors other than those being studied). There’s no consensus on verb tenses in research papers. For the literature review, most academic editors recommend using the past simple or present perfect when talking about past research, and the present simple when referring to general truths. When citing previous research in your article, use past tense. Whatever a previous researcher said, did or wrote happened at some specific, definite time in the past and is not still being done. Results that were relevant only in the past or to a particular study and have not yet been generally accepted as fact also should be expressed in past tense.